IMAGE VIA  CREATIVE CONVEX

IMAGE VIA CREATIVE CONVEX

 

Course description

The twenty-first century began much as the twentieth century did for the United States, with high levels of immigration. This has affected not only the nation, but the discipline of sociology. Just as early twentieth century Chicago School sociology focused on immigration and settlement issues, so too the first decade of the twenty-first century shows a flurry of sociological imagination devoted to immigration scholarship. This course will center on the key issues, and approaches coming out of this renovated sociology of immigration, but we will also include approaches to the study of immigration from history, anthropology, political science and ethnic studies. While we will consider comparative and historical approaches, our focus will be on the late twentieth century through the present. Through the examination of case studies of the main migrant-sending regions – Central America and Mexico to the US, Africa to Europe, and Asia to the Middle East, we will examine some of the main challenges both host and sending societies endure as a result of becoming part of what scholars of migration refer to as the age of migration. Students with an interest in contemporary U.S. immigration will be exposed to a survey of key theoretical approaches and relevant issues in immigration studies in the social sciences. Current themes such as globalization, transnationalism, gendered migration, immigrant labor markets, militarization of the U.S.-Mexican border, U.S. migration policy, borders, “illegality” and the industry of migration will be included.

[-Dr. Veronica Montes]

course goals

By the end of this course, each student is expected to be able to demonstrate:

  •  To critically analyze contemporary debates around immigration, immigration policy, border controls, citizenship, mobility and social construct of illegality in the US and at the global level;

  • An understanding of historical processes of migration and factors leading migration not only in the US but also all across the globe;

  • To critically analyze why people migrate and demonstrate a clear understanding of theoretical approaches that explain these mechanisms;

  • An understanding of concepts from sociological theories of migration to experiences of migration; and

  • To critically analyze the impacts that migration has at the macro and micro levels for all people involved in this phenomenon.

[-Dr. Veronica Montes]

course format

Class will meet twice a week for one hour and twenty minutes each session. The first class of the week will be devoted, in its entirety or in large part, to a “socratic lecture,” or a lecture with participatory elements. The second class of the week will be devoted to different kinds of class discussions and workshops.

Everything you need for this course is online — here, on Moodle, and on Box.

course requirements

SELF-SELECTED GRADING PROPORTIONS

This course will be graded on a 0.0 - 4.0 scale.

By the end of the month, you will each submit, via Moodle, a grade contract indicating how much you want each of the following three parts of your grade to be worth. Each must vary within the bounds indicated below, and the total must add up to 100%.

If you would like to change this ratio halfway through the semester, you must submit a revised form to me, also via Moodle, at that time.

[10-30]% Participation

There are a number of different ways to participate. First, you need to be in class (i.e., attendance). You can then participate by (1) asking questions in lecture, (2) participating in a small group discussion, or (3) a whole class discussion. You can (4) elect to lead class discussions on a topic of interest to you (please email me at least one full week in advance before you’d like to do this).

[20-50]% Class journal

Starting in Week 2, you are required to write one class journal entry per week (excluding spring break). Each entry (typed in the template I provide) should be a 300 - 500 words personal engagement with the class material for that week. You must demonstrate that you and your brain have interacted with class materials and, ideally, classmates that week. Conciseness is better. Write well — spelling, grammar, punctuation, and style all count.

example | journal entry to process connections among class readings

example | journal entry to debrief from class discussion

example | journal entry to tie class materials to current events or

[30-70]% Final project

The final project allows students to further research a topic explored (or not) in the course, but still relevant, and prepare a ten-minute presentation using digital tools (e.g., blog, storymap, podcast, screencast, video documentary, etc.). I suggest reviewing Dr. Montes’ blog at http://veronicamontes.blogs.brynmawr.edu/, to which she has uploaded former students’ projects from recent courses. You will present your work in the last two weeks of class.


I reserve the righto to amend this syllabus.


IMAGE VIA  CREATIVE CONVEX

IMAGE VIA CREATIVE CONVEX

READING AND ASSIGNMENT LIST

Week 1 | COURSE REVIEW

W 23 January | attendance required for admission to class


Week 2 | WHY DO PEOPLE MIGRATE?

M 28 January

required

  • introduction in Solimano’s International Migration in the Age of Crisis and Globalization (2010)

  • chapter 3 in Castles + Miller’s The Age of Migration (2003)

choose one or the other

  • chapter 2 in Solimano’s International Migration in the Age of Crisis and Globalization (2010)

  • chapters 2 and 4 in Castles + Miller’s The Age of Migration (2003)

W 30 January


Week 3 | WHAT AND WHO ARE MIGRANTS?

M 4 February

required

  • introduction in Nail’s The Figure of the Migrant (2015)

  • chapters 1 and 4 in Standing’s The Precariat: The New Dangerous Class (2016)

W 6 February | turn in class journal (1/10) via moodle by midnight


Week 4 | THE FEMINIZATION OF LABOR MIGRATION

Please note that my classroom and office are hell-free zones.

M 11 February

required

  • chapter 5 (“The Phillippine Domestic”) in Rodriguez’s Migrants for Export (2010)

  • chapter 2 (“Nepali Women Coming to America: Why and How?”) in Hamal Gurun’s Nepali Migrant Women (2015)

  • Parrenas Salazar’s “Migrant Filipina Domestic Workers and the International Division of Reproductive Labor” (2000)

W 13 February | turn in class journal (2/10) via moodle by midnight


Week 5 | MIGRATION AND MASCULINITIES

M 18 February

required

  • Nare’s “Sri Lankan Men are Working as Cleaners and Carers: Negotiating Masculinity in Naples” (2010)

  • Montes’ “The Role of Emotions in the Construction of Masculinity: Guatemalan Migrant Men, Transnational Migration, and Family Relations” (2013)

W 20 February | turn in class journal (3/10) via moodle by midnight


Week 6 | GUEST WORKERS

M 25 February

required

  • Morgan’s “Evaluating Guest Worker Programs in the U.S.: A Comparison of the Bracero Program and PResident Bush’s Proposed Immigraiton Reform Plan” (2004)

  • Castle’s “Guestworkers in Europe: A Resurrection?” (2006)

  • Ruhs and Martin’s “Numbers vs Rights: Trade-Offs and Guest Worker Programs” (2008)

W 27 February | turn in class journal (4/10) via moodle by midnight


Week 7 | THE CONTESTED POLITICS OF MOBILITY

M 4 March

required

  • introduction in Squire’s The Contested Politics of Mobility: Borderzones and Irregularity (2011)

  • chapter 1 (“The Proliferation of Borders”) in Mezzadra and Nielson’s Border as Method or the Multiplication of Labor (2013)

W 6 March | turn in class journal (5/10) via moodle by midnight

F 8 March | submit grade proportion choices on moodle


Week 8 | Spring Break


Week 9 | migration policy as racial control

M 18 March

required

  • Heyman’s “Constructing a Virtual Wall: Race and Citizenship in U.S.-Mexico Border Policing” in Dowling and Inda’s Governing Immigration Through Crime (2013)

  • ch 1 in Haney Lopez’s White by Law

optional

  • the rest of Haney Lopez’s White by Law

W 20 March | turn in class journal (6/10) via moodle by midnight


Week 10 | “follow the money” : the business of migration

M 25 March

required

  • introduction (“The Illegality Industry at Europe’s African Frontier”) in Ruben’s Illegality, Inc. (2014)

  • chapter 4 (“The Border Spectacle”) in Ruben’s Illegality, Inc. (2014)

W 27 March | turn in class journal (7/10) via moodle by midnight


Week 11 | The U.S. - Mexico BORDER

M 1 April

required

  • preface + introduction in Ganster + Lorey’s The US - Mexican Border Today: Conflict and Cooperation in Historical Perspective

  • Bacon’s “The Sadness of the Border Wall”

W 3 April | turn in class journal (8/10) via moodle by midnight


Week 12 | immigrant policing, deportation, and incarceration

M 8 April

required

  • introduction, (“Mass Deportation and the Neoliberal Cycle”) in Golash-Boza’s Deported: Immigrant Policing, Deportable Labor, and Global Capitalism

  • chapters 5 (“Getting Caught: Targets of Deportation Policy”) in Golash-Boza’s Deported: Immigrant Policing, Deportable Labor, and Global Capitalism

  • chapter 6 (Behind Bars: Immigration Detention and Prison Life”) in Golash-Boza’s Deported: Immigrant Policing, Deportable Labor, and Global Capitalism

W 10 April | turn in class journal (9/10) via moodle by midnight

F 12 April | submit revised grade proportion preferences on moodle (if you want to revise them)


Week 13 | resilience, RESISTANCE, and ACTIVISM

M 15 April

required

  • chapter 7 (“Marchers Without Borders”) in Anderson, Ruben Illegality, Inc (2014)

  • chapter 14 in Dowling, Julie Left Out But Not Shut Down: Political ACtivism and the Undocumented Student Movement (2013)

W 17 April | turn in class journal (10/10) via moodle by midnight


Week 14 | final presentations

M 22 April | schedule TBD [could be review instead]

W 24 April | schedule TBD


Week 15 | final presentations

M 29 April | schedule TBD

W 1 May | schedule TBD


Week 16 | finals week

F 10 May 12:00 pm | all students (not just seniors) must turn in all final presentation (and course) materials via Moodle

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