A BRIEF HISTORY OF Racial Residential Segregation in the United States

AN INTERSECTION I WEST PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA. (IMAGE SOURCE)

ABSTRACT

The relationship between racial residential segregation and integration since 1960 has been neither simplistic nor linear, but has actually grown more complex over time. For example, while overall segregation levels have declined since their peak in 1960, progress has slowed significantly since 1980, and the segregation of Latinos and Asians is actually increasing (Rugh and Massey, 2013). Many demographic factors besides race, including nativity, linguistic ability, and socioeconomic status, are critical to the processes that distribute individuals and groups across social and physical space and thus either facilitate or frustrate their upward mobility. It is critical to understand modern dynamics of segregation and integration as they have significant effects on prospects for reducing racial inequality.

CITATION

Pinto–Coelho, Joanna M. and Camille Z. Charles. 2015. “Racial Residential Segregation in the United States,” in the International Encyclopedia of the Behavioral & Social Sciences. Oxford, UK: Elsevier, B.V.