Joanna Pinto-Coelho, PhD
 
 

Investigating intra-ethnic divisions among Latino immigrants in Miami, Florida

ABSTRACT

The demographic diversification of the Latino population, both in terms of generational change and national origin, calls for the exploration of pan-ethnic Latino intra-group dynamics. These demographic shifts are particularly salient in the Miami Dade County, Florida metropolitan area, making it an ideal case study for investigating pan-ethnic social cohesion and divisions. This article analyzes forty-five semi-structured qualitative interviews with Latino immigrants in Miami from nine nationalities, and seeks to understand how immigrants from various countries perceive social divisions between and among one another, and how these perceptions and prejudices may affect their interactions and, therefore, ideas about pan-ethnic unity. We find the most significant perceived social divisions exist between Caribbean Latinos and continental Latin American Latinos.

CITATION

Mallet, Marie Laure and Joanna M. Pinto-Coelho. 2018.“Investigating intra-ethnic divisions among Latino immigrants in Miami, Florida." Latino Studies 16(1):91-112.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1057/s41276-017-0108-5

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Segregated Diversity

ABSTRACT

As both older and newer immigrant gateway metropolitan areas grow more racially diverse, scholars of neighborhood change want to know whether these areas are also becoming more residentially integrated. While it is logically and mathematically plausible to assume that increasing racial diversity directly leads to increased racial residential integration, this paper argues that the empirical reality may actually be the opposite. To investigate this concept, we use statistical and cartographic methods to analyze tract-level Census data of the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area, a case study that is both representative and unique. Results indicate that increasing racial diversity in the Washington, D.C. metropolitan area between 1990 and 2010 coincided with increased racial residential segregation. We discuss the theoretical and methodological implications of these findings and make recommendations for future research.

CITATION

Pinto–Coelho, Joanna and Tukufu Zuberi. 2015. “Segregated Diversity.” Sociology of Race and Ethnicity 1(4):475-489.

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1177/2332649215581057

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A Brief History of Racial Residential Segregation in the United States

ABSTRACT

The relationship between racial residential segregation and integration since 1960 has been neither simplistic nor linear, but has actually grown more complex over time. For example, while overall segregation levels have declined since their peak in 1960, progress has slowed significantly since 1980, and the segregation of Latinos and Asians is actually increasing (Rugh and Massey, 2013). Many demographic factors besides race, including nativity, linguistic ability, and socioeconomic status, are critical to the processes that distribute individuals and groups across social and physical space and thus either facilitate or frustrate their upward mobility. It is critical to understand modern dynamics of segregation and integration as they have significant effects on prospects for reducing racial inequality.

CITATION

Pinto–Coelho, Joanna M. and Camille Z. Charles. 2015. “Racial Residential Segregation in the United States,” in the International Encyclopedia of the Behavioral & Social Sciences. Oxford, UK: Elsevier, B.V.

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Bryn Mawr College Alumnae Bulletin

 
 

“I Will Not Be Afraid of Women”

An essay about the magic of attending a historically women’s college.

 
 

CITATION

Pinto-Coelho, Joanna. 2016. “I Will Not Be Afraid of Women.” Bryn Mawr College Alumnae Bulletin. November.

 
 

“The Power of the Pipeline”

A piece featuring Bryn Mawr College’s Mellon Mays Undergraduate Fellowship (MMUF) Program and modeled after the New York Times’ recurring “Table for Three” features.

 

CITATION

Pinto-Coelho, Joanna. 2017. “The Power of the Pipeline.” Bryn Mawr College Alumnae Bulletin. June.

 
 
 
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